Hymn books: what we’ve lost and gained.

blue hymn booksI’ve really enjoyed following some blog discussions about hymnals in recent weeks (which you can find at the end of this post). In the space of around 30 years most church congregations have moved away from using them at all. Those piles of well-thumbed and well-sung collections of hymns have disappeared from church foyers and from the experience of many church-goers. In fact, if you are under the age of twenty you may have no memories at all of singing from a hymn book.

Last night I pulled out my little, moth-eaten, blue hymnal at the dinner table.  My ‘elderly’ teenagers and twenty-year-old were bemused by the little tome. And while not entirely oblivious to the contents, they did find my rendition of the drawn out and repetitive phrase from “All Hail the Power of Jesus’ Name” quite amusing: ‘And Crow… ow.. ow.. own Him! Crown Him! Crown Him! Crown Him and Crown Him Lord of All’. (Who said hymns were easy to sing, and not repetitive?)

Whenever there is a great cultural shift in the way something is done there will naturally be losses, and gains. (The internet itself is one giant case in point. While it allows me the opportunity to write and share with people on the other side of the world it can also distract me from giving good attention to the people under my roof!)

And of course we shouldn’t forget two things: the church has done without hymn books before – when people repeated or memorised the lyrics; and, the collection of hymns we have used in church in the last few hundred years are not actually the ones referred to in the Bible, in Ephesians 5:18-19. Those hymns and spiritual songs have been lost forever.

For me, the move away from hymn books has meant the loss of something tangible, a bound book of songs for the church, which have been agreed on and published for their value in helping us praise God, in spirit and truth. People could own or borrow a hymn book and look up songs and reflect on the lyrics. As a child who loved words, I spent many a Sunday service pouring over the hymn book (especially if the sermon was very long or over my head). I devoured both the poetry and theology they contained. They challenged me to learn new words and concepts about God. I was also fascinated by the names of the hymn writers and the years they lived, and wrote, as well as the number of hymns written by each person. This little blue book was something of a little Blue Box, bigger on the inside, and a portal to the rich history of the church for the past few centuries. (If you understand this Doctor Who reference, you may like to visit my old Blue Box Parables blog, on finding Christ in popular culture.)

While I have been brought up on hymns, (and learned to sing harmony because of them, and probably learned to read music from the hymn book on the piano at home) I am not mourning their loss. I have been part of the movement of change, and spent the last few decades looking for spiritual songs and hymns which will edify and teach us well. Alongside this new body of songs, most churches retain the ‘good old hymns’ in their repertoire, hymns that are biblical and continue to encourage people today. Modern adaptations of hymns also help keep the ones worth singing alive (while those full of obscurities and archaic phrases are happily shelved for good).

The authors of the following posts have explored these losses and gains in much more detail and you can read them at your leisure. But to close, I will quote myself for a change, and refer you back to a post written in the defense of new songs in 2012.

In a nutshell, I argued that new songs say that God is doing something here and now, not just a few hundred years ago: “. . . it also comes down to the concept of “renewing our minds”. By hearing the gospel explained in new and fresh ways, our understanding of God and the gospel of His grace is strengthened and deepened. That has got to be a good thing.” 

You will find that Tim Challies also picks up this point in the third post below (which is his own response to his first post about things we lost when hymn books were set aside). The second and fourth links below are other people’s responses to Challies’ original post.

I would love to hear your thoughts on this topic. Please comment below. Blessings!

https://www.challies.com/articles/what-we-lost-when-we-lost-hymnals

https://gregoryktyree.wordpress.com/2017/04/06/what-we-gained-when-we-gave-up-our-hymnals/

https://www.challies.com/articles/what-we-gained-when-we-lost-the-hymnal

https://chrislinzey.com/2017/04/09/hymnals-we-dont-need-no-stinkin-hymnals/

https://sevennotesofgrace.com/2012/07/31/new-songs-say-god-is-doing-something-now/

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Hymn books: what we’ve lost and gained.

  1. Great blog post Ros! Very inciteful and well rounded… I personally have hated hymn books because of the feeling of “religiousness” when going to a church that put a lot of things before grace, knowing God as a personal friend and saviour and making disciples instead of preserving a congregation. I am glad to be away with the books, though I agree that some hymns need preservation in modern adaptions.

  2. I do miss the hymnals, to a degree. I am almost 60 years old, so, of course, I grew up on hymns and hymnals. I had favorite hymns when I was a child (At Calvary, Love Lifted Me, The Old Rugged Cross), and a different set of favorites, later on (When I Survey the Wondrous Cross, Fairest Lord Jesus, Jesus, Lover of My Soul). I enjoy some of the new renditions of some of those, such as Chris Tomlin and Matt Redman’s “The Wonderful Cross.” Sadly, the church I attend tends to only use music written in the last decade. I’m not sure that’s deliberate, it’s just the way it happens.

    However, there are some great songs being written. Some. I love “What A Beautiful Name,” for example, by Hillsongs. It is my current favorite “worship song.” My biggest complaint about modern worship music is the sameness. But then, I think back and remember that many hymns were sung to the same hymn tunes.

    As my college band director said, “The more things change, the more they stay the same.”

    • Thanks for your comments Jeff. Funny how we see songs from the 90s as old….but we still use some of them….like How deep the Fathers Love for us. I am amazed at how those hymn tunes come back so quickly to mind when someone mentions the names (thought I had forgotten them). No wonder God wants us to put words with music, as it makes them all the more cemented in our minds. Blessings! Ros

  3. Rosalind, Very interesting, and I agree about the hymns needing to be in a more modern format, to catch the attention of the younger generation, but they still do contain the true message, so that is most important, but for us ‘oldies’ we do often miss the old ones we grew up with. MJ

    • Yes. I have been reading through the hymn book. Do you remember 323 which we always sang after communion. Verses 4-7 only for some reason. “Too soon we rise the symbols disappear…” I like that.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s